Posts tagged ‘Penn State Cancer Institute’

Lifesaving help from across the globe

Jim Miller, center, toasts his donor, Stefan Eichert, right, with John Moore, left, the businessman who invited Miller to accompany him on a trip to Germany. All three men are wearing casual shirts and jeans and holding mugs of beer. A candle is on the table in front of them. Behind them is a marbled wall and a wall decorated with slats of wood.

Jim Miller, center, toasts his donor, Stefan Eichert, right, with John Moore, left, the businessman who invited Miller to accompany him on a trip to Germany.

By Carolyn Kimmel

Sometimes the worst things in life can turn up gifts that far outlast the trial. That’s what Jim Miller tells people.

The Red Lion man was diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome—a pre-leukemic syndrome—in October 2012 and given the choice of a stem cell transplant or other treatment alternatives that may have resulted in about two more years of life. He chose the transplant.

Although the wait for a match lasted a year—during which time chemotherapy and 27 blood transfusions achieved partial control of the disease—Miller never expected his donor would hail from across the globe.

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February 27, 2019 at 2:30 pm Leave a comment

Lifesaving lymphoma treatment comes to Penn State Cancer Institute

A graphic of a large, round CAR-T cell with oval-shaped protrusions touching a cancer cell. The cancer cell is round and has tentacles resembling an octopus.

CAR-T cells recognize CD19 antigens on the surface of lymphoma cells as targets for their killing action.

By Abby Sajid

For people with an aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, treatments can be limited. Enter a new treatment called Yescarta. Yescarta, or axicabtagene ciloleucel, can be nothing short of “miraculous” for these patients, according to Dr. Shin Mineishi, a medical oncologist at Penn State Cancer Institute. Based on the campus of Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, the Cancer Institute is the only hospital in central Pennsylvania that offers this last-resort treatment for certain cancer patients.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Yescarta in October 2017 for adult patients with a type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma called large B-cell lymphoma if their cancer fails to respond to chemotherapy or returns after two or more treatments. Yescarta is for adult patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma, high grade B-cell lymphoma, and DLBCL arising from follicular lymphoma.

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December 5, 2018 at 10:30 am Leave a comment

Team research reveals how cells “eat and sleep” may impact several cancer types

Katherine Aird, center, talks to two members of her research team about their latest work. All three are wearing white lab coats and smiling. Behind them is lab equipment and a refrigerator.

Katherine Aird, center, talks to members of her research team, Kelly Leon and Erika Dahl.

By Katherine Brind’Amour

From aging to cancer—with quite a bit in between—Katherine Aird, assistant professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology at Penn State College of Medicine, and her team have a whole world of research opportunities in front of them. This is not just because they have a lot yet to discover, as Aird insists they do, but because the progress they have made has incredibly broad potential impact.

The team’s latest research reveals that skin, pancreatic, bladder, ovarian and colorectal tumor cells may share a common target for new therapy approaches. In each cancer type, forcing a particular change in the cell’s metabolism (how it uses nutrients) may shut off or suppress its growth, essentially putting it to sleep.

This forced sleep state is known as senescence, and together with cell metabolism, it makes up the heart of Aird’s research.

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September 25, 2018 at 10:00 am Leave a comment

In their shoes: pediatric cancer survivors grown up and working “For the Kids”

A young man wearing a button-down shirt with a Hershey Medical Center logo leans over a patient bed and wipes the side rail with a cloth. He is wearing purple gloves. The bed has a Hershey Medical Center logo on the headboard.

Cole Horne, a former Four Diamonds child, cleans a patient bed at Hershey Medical Center.

By Carolyn Kimmel

Cole Horne knows that being diagnosed with Burkett’s Lymphoma at age 6 was a life-changing moment, but his memories are not of the large tumor that had to be removed or the five months of chemotherapy that followed; he remembers the fun.

Yes, the fun.

“When you are in Penn State Children’s Hospital, you don’t even feel like you’re in the hospital. There’s music therapy, pet therapy, bingo,” said Horne, now 20 and cancer-free for 13 years. “Then I began participating in THON when I was 7 until I was 13, and that took my mind off what was going on. Everyone is so happy, and they’re there celebrating you.”

Today this childhood cancer survivor is back at Penn State Health, this time as an employee, drawn back because of the excellent support he and his family received from the staff and Four Diamonds.

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August 7, 2018 at 10:00 am Leave a comment


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