Posts tagged ‘Ghana’

Penn State Hershey Ghana team update, Feb. 26

Reena Thomas, Elizabeth Wallace, Corinne Landis, and Kate Belser.

Reena Thomas, Elizabeth Wallace, Corinne Landis and Kate Belser.

Editor’s note:  Penn State Hershey clinical participants (senior medical students, residents, nurse practitioner students and faculty) are currently in rural Ghana to support and provide training for Ghanaian clinicians at the Eastern Regional Hospital. The trip is made possible partially thanks to a partnership with Mountcrest University College, which has helped with medical logistics and travel in the country. The team is sending periodic updates while there.

It’s our last day here at Regional Hospital Koforidua and we are certainly sad to say goodbye. Reflecting back on the past four weeks, we have been a part of a wonderful start to a beautiful collaboration between Mountcrest University College, Penn State College of Medicine and Regional Hospital Koforidua. It has been a very impressive month filled with interesting cases including marasmus, malaria and meningitis. Even more impressive, however, is the wonderful staff with whom we have been able to work alongside and form lasting relationships with. An inspiring group of dedicated, hard working, and resourceful medical providers.

We enjoyed our time with the patients and staff of the Regional Hospital Koforidua and are incredibly grateful for this opportunity. With much appreciation we say, ‘Me da ase pa!’ – thank you so very much for welcoming us and letting us join your team and learn from your practice. We could not have asked for a better experience.

 

Written by Reena Thomas, Elizabeth Wallace, Corinne Landis, and Kate Belser. 

February 26, 2016 at 4:08 pm Leave a comment

Penn State Hershey Ghana team update, Feb. 25

Eileen Hennrikus

Dr. Eileen Hennrikus presents at a symposium in Ghana, bringing together representatives of Mountcrest University College, Penn State College of Medicine and Regional Hospital Koforidua.

Editor’s note:  Penn State Hershey clinical participants (senior medical students, residents, nurse practitioner students and faculty) are currently in rural Ghana to support and provide training for Ghanaian clinicians at the Eastern Regional Hospital. The trip is made possible partially thanks to a partnership with Mountcrest University College, which has helped with medical logistics and travel in the country. The team is sending periodic updates while there.

It has been an exciting two days here at Regional Hospital Koforidua as the inaugural symposium, a collaboration between Mountcrest University, Penn State College of Medicine and Regional Hospital Koforidua, was held. Presenters included representatives from all institutions and covered topics ranging from neonatal resuscitation, diabetes management and improving surgical outcomes for thyphoid fever to acid base abnormalities, management of club foot, and the sociocultural impact of diseases including HIV.

Our very own Kate Thompson, Med/Peds PGY4, Haley Spagnole, Peds PGY3, Dr. Eileen Hennrikus, Internal Medicine, and Dr. William Hennrikus, Peds Orthopedics, presented topics throughout the conference.

Overall the conference was a tremendous success and as medical students, soon to be interns, it was very educational and a wonderful demonstration of interdisciplinary and cultural collaboration.

Written by Reena Thomas, Elizabeth Wallace, Corinne Landis, and Kate Belser. 

February 25, 2016 at 1:32 pm Leave a comment

Penn State Hershey Ghana team update, Feb. 11

Dr. Mike Malone

Dr. Mike Malone gives a presentation in Ghana.

Editor’s note:  Penn State Hershey clinical participants (senior medical students, residents, nurse practitioner students and faculty) are currently in rural Ghana to support and provide training for Ghanaian clinicians at the Eastern Regional Hospital. The team is sending periodic updates while there.

It has been a very exciting week at Regional Hospital Koforidua! We have seen lots of tuberculosis, malaria, HIV, typhoid fever and even a possible Schistosomiasis diagnosis, however, we are still awaiting confirmation. At the same time we have also seen great examples of cases that are more commonly seen in Hershey, PA including pneumonia, CHF, gastroenteritis, pelvic pain and motor vehicle accidents. Each patient presents with great learning opportunities, exam findings and lessons in practicing resourceful medical care.

On the wards, both Hershey residents and Koforidua house officers have been excellent teachers and role models as we enhance our clinical skills and further our differential diagnoses. Today we enjoyed two special presentations. The first was by Dr. Michael Malone who presented on Skin Conditions in Pregnancy. It was filled with great clinical pearls and treatment options for a wide variety of benign and pathologic rashes. This evening Dr. Kate Thompson presented on Nutritional Deficiencies and Dehydration. This was particularly relevant given that two children currently on the pediatric ward are diagnosed with Kwashiorkor.

We are only two weeks in, but we have certainly learned a great deal already and are very thankful for this opportunity. We are much looking forward to the next two weeks and the experiences ahead. Stay tuned as we join the surgery team next week.

Written by Reena Thomas, Elizabeth Wallace, Corinne Landis, and Kate Belser. 

February 11, 2016 at 4:48 pm Leave a comment

College of Medicine helps seed medical school library in Ghana

Editor’s note: This story is one in an occasional series highlighting a relationship between Penn State College of Medicine and Mountcrest University College in Ghana.

Medical students in the United States don’t generally have to worry about things like unreliable electricity and Internet service. This is not the case in rural Ghana, where Mountcrest University College (MCU) is preparing to open the first private medical school in the country. Without reliable service, students are more dependent on printed materials than the digital resources available to their American counterparts.

Two 40-foot containers of donated materials were shipped to Ghana.

Two 40-foot containers of donated materials were shipped to Ghana.

As part of an ongoing partnership, Penn State College of Medicine library staff recently loaded two, 40-foot containers with donated materials bound for Mountcrest. This was the second donation from the College of Medicine since the inception of Mountcrest’s medical school last year.

The College of Medicine is in the process of renovating the George T. Harrell Health Sciences Library, requiring staff to cull large amounts of printed materials from its collection.

“This was a really opportune moment in time where we had this massive amount of materials that we were going to be removing because Penn State University Libraries has electronic access to the materials and the real estate is more valuable than functioning as a book archive,” said Cynthia Robinson, director, George T. Harrell Health Sciences Library.

This allowed Mountcrest to receive a significant amount of materials for only the cost of shipping.

(more…)

October 28, 2015 at 10:11 am Leave a comment

Story Update: Mountcrest University College breaks ground on Medical School

Editor’s Note: Penn State Medicine highlighted the relationship between Penn State College of Medicine and Ghana’s Mountcrest University College in January. The College of Medicine’s Dr. Ben Fredrick recently returned from Ghana to give an update. Follow Penn State Medicine for updates on the College’s work with MountCrest.

Kwaku Ansa-Asare and Helena Ansa-Asare, founders of MountCrest University School. The school’s teaching hospital will be named after their son, Kwame Ansa-Asare, who died in 1999 at the age of 19 from leukemia.

Kwaku Ansa-Asare and Helena Ansa-Asare, founders of MountCrest University School. The school’s teaching hospital will be named after their son, Kwame Ansa-Asare, who died in 1999 at the age of 19 from leukemia.

Mountcrest University College has broken ground on its medical school, the first in rural Ghana.

The school is on track to welcome its first class of medical students this September. Students will walk into a new four-story education building in the village of Larteh. The building will include lecture halls, small group rooms, and a library. Planned are a dedicated medical school building and a teaching hospital. Construction of the hospital is planned to begin May.

Mountcrest will have its first White Coat Ceremony on September 5. White Coat Ceremony is when first year medical students receive their white doctor coats, signifying the beginning of medical education. Student coats are shorter than regular doctor coats, to easily identify them in the clinic setting.

“This is a significant event in Ghana because it marks an important decision by Mountcrest leadership to help their health profession students develop humanistic qualities through a longitudinal humanities-in-medicine curriculum,” said Dr. Ben Fredrick (’00), director of the Global Health Center at the College of Medicine. Dr. A. Craig Hillemeier, College of Medicine dean, is expected to attend the ceremony.

The College of Medicine was recognized in Mountcrest’s law school commencement and during the groundbreaking ceremony by both Mountcrest founder Kwaku Ansa-Asare and a representative of the President of Ghana.

Mountcrest is establishing the first private medical school in Ghana, and is also the first to build a medical school in a rural area of Ghana. The College of Medicine is working closely with Mountcrest to support the endeavor.

(more…)

March 30, 2015 at 1:46 pm 1 comment


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