Posts tagged ‘College of Medicine’

Inspired student Sarayna Schock delivers produce program

A photo of Sarayna Shock at Beaver Stadium

Sarayna Schock

When Sarayna Schock sets her mind to something, there’s no stopping her. The second year Penn State College of Medicine student shows an admirable level of dedication to service while achieving her own goals. Her personal story drives her to help others with similar challenges and to make a difference in her community, including serving with LionCare, the student-run medical clinic in downtown Harrisburg, and abroad in Zambia with the College’s Global Health Scholars program.

To get there required four years in the Air Force and two years in the reserves. Serving in the military was the way Schock funded her medical education. Enlisting, however, required some changes. (more…)

October 6, 2016 at 8:04 am Leave a comment

College of Medicine students take on interpreter roles

You’re in a foreign country, unfamiliar with the language and you suddenly are in an emergency room gravely ill. No one speaks your language. You’re frightened, confused and miming your symptoms to a doctor who is actually trying to ask about family history or medication allergies.

This scenario is common for many immigrants to the United States and the health care providers who care for them.

To address this situation, bilingual medical students attending Penn State College of Medicine can now participate in a medical interpreter training and certification program through the Health Federation of Philadelphia.

The program was the result of happenstance when Dr. Patricia Silveyra, assistant professor of pediatrics, biochemistry and molecular biology, and humanities, attended a meeting of the Latin American Medical Student Association where a group of bilingual students questioned why they couldn’t use their second language to help their patients.

“You can’t just show up and translate because you’re bilingual,” Silveyra explained. Medical interpreters require training and certifications, and they need to understand the value of cultural competency. (more…)

September 14, 2016 at 9:14 am 1 comment

Remembering Dr. Thomas L. Leaman: A pioneer in family medicine


Dr. Thomas Leaman’s chair portrait

As Penn State College of Medicine’s founding Dean Dr. George T. Harrell met with the local practitioners at Hershey Hospital in the early 1960s, the story goes that he laid out three conditions for employment at the soon-to-be built Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.

First, they had to give up their private practices and move their offices into the Medical Center. Second, they had to accept an academic salary. And third, they had to complete a year of training at their own expense working with medical students and residents.

Dr. Thomas Leaman was the only one who agreed.

“The other doctors from town – around 10 or 15 of them – were incensed,” recalled Dr. C. Max Lang, who came to Hershey in 1966 as the founding chair of the Department of Comparative Medicine. “Tom didn’t agree right away. Some of the doctors asked Tom to go talk with Dr. Harrell and he made an appointment to do so. Dr. Harrell began to explain his vision where teaching would come first, then patient care, then research. By the time the meeting was over, Tom said he would like to join.”

Leaman, the founding chair of the Department of Family and Community Medicine – the first of its kind in the United States – died on Friday, Sept. 2. (more…)

September 7, 2016 at 11:57 am Leave a comment

From the military to becoming a physician assistant

Editor’s Note: The Commencement Ceremony for the graduating Class of 2016 will take place on Sunday, May 15, 2016. For more information on Commencement, visit this site. 

A little more than two years ago, Myra Galusha was looking for a physician assistant program that would be tough enough to balance out her lack of medical background.

At Penn State College of Medicine, the 32-year-old Michigan native found that and more: “That part was not a let-down,” she laughed.

Galusha is one of 144 medical students, 81 graduate students, and 30 physician assistants who will receive degrees this Sunday.

Myra Galusha

Myra Galusha

Galusha completed the military academy at West Point, majored in law, and then spent more than five years in the Army. After multiple deployments and time overseas, she eventually left the military. She and her husband, Colt – who is from the Gettysburg area – decided to move back to Pennsylvania when he got a job at Fort Indiantown Gap as an instructor pilot.

After leaving her work in military intelligence, Galusha’s sports background – and history of multiple sports injuries – drew her to the medical field. Being a new mother, she didn’t want to attempt medical school, so a physician assistant program seemed like a better fit. (more…)

May 12, 2016 at 10:30 am 1 comment

Medical school leaders convene in Hershey to discuss innovation

The future of medical education was the focus of discussion at a conference in Hershey this week. In conjunction with the American Medical Association, Penn State College of Medicine convened the 32 medical school members of the AMA’s newly expanded Accelerating Change in Medical Education Consortium.

The AMA launched its Accelerating Change in Medical Education initiative in 2013 to bridge the gaps that exist between how medical students are trained and how health care is delivered. The AMA has since awarded $12.5 million in grants to 32 of the nation’s leading medical schools to develop innovative curricula that can ultimately be implemented in medical schools across the country. (more…)

March 10, 2016 at 12:18 pm Leave a comment

Remembering Robert Bonneau

Robert Bonneau

Robert Bonneau (file photo)

Robert Bonneau had a passion for Penn State College of Medicine and its students. Through his 25 year career with Penn State, he served in a number of roles that advanced both the education and research missions, and endeared himself to hundreds of medical and graduate students.

Bonneau died on Thursday, March 3 after an illness.


March 4, 2016 at 9:26 am 20 comments

Penn State Hershey Ghana team update, Feb. 26

Reena Thomas, Elizabeth Wallace, Corinne Landis, and Kate Belser.

Reena Thomas, Elizabeth Wallace, Corinne Landis and Kate Belser.

Editor’s note:  Penn State Hershey clinical participants (senior medical students, residents, nurse practitioner students and faculty) are currently in rural Ghana to support and provide training for Ghanaian clinicians at the Eastern Regional Hospital. The trip is made possible partially thanks to a partnership with Mountcrest University College, which has helped with medical logistics and travel in the country. The team is sending periodic updates while there.

It’s our last day here at Regional Hospital Koforidua and we are certainly sad to say goodbye. Reflecting back on the past four weeks, we have been a part of a wonderful start to a beautiful collaboration between Mountcrest University College, Penn State College of Medicine and Regional Hospital Koforidua. It has been a very impressive month filled with interesting cases including marasmus, malaria and meningitis. Even more impressive, however, is the wonderful staff with whom we have been able to work alongside and form lasting relationships with. An inspiring group of dedicated, hard working, and resourceful medical providers.

We enjoyed our time with the patients and staff of the Regional Hospital Koforidua and are incredibly grateful for this opportunity. With much appreciation we say, ‘Me da ase pa!’ – thank you so very much for welcoming us and letting us join your team and learn from your practice. We could not have asked for a better experience.


Written by Reena Thomas, Elizabeth Wallace, Corinne Landis, and Kate Belser. 

February 26, 2016 at 4:08 pm Leave a comment

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