Remembering Robert Bonneau

Robert Bonneau

Robert Bonneau (file photo)

Robert Bonneau had a passion for Penn State College of Medicine and its students. Through his 25 year career with Penn State, he served in a number of roles that advanced both the education and research missions, and endeared himself to hundreds of medical and graduate students.

Bonneau died on Thursday, March 3 after an illness.

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March 4, 2016 at 9:26 am 20 comments

Student-run free clinic to open at Tyrone this Saturday

Amidst clinical rotations and long days of studying, third-year Penn State College of Medicine students at the University Park Regional Campus will soon be putting their education into practice in a new setting.  They have spent the last several months preparing for LionCare Tyrone, a student-run free clinic, which opens its doors to the public this Saturday, March 5.

“This is reminding me why I went to medical school in the first place – to help people who really need medical care,” said Clay Cooper, who is co-director of the student-run clinic that will offer free medical services with no insurance required. “There’s definitely a need for this type of service in Tyrone, and it’s an exciting opportunity to help start this from the ground up.”

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March 3, 2016 at 11:10 am Leave a comment

Recollections of an alumnus

Editor’s Note: This month marks the 50th anniversary of the Penn State College of Medicine groundbreaking. The first class of students entered the College’s doors in 1967. Dr. Owen B. Ellington is a member of the fourth graduating class. Late last year, he gave a speech at the annual alumni dinner that discussed his memories of campus at that time.

When Dr. Owen B. Ellington entered Penn State College of Medicine in 1970 as a member of the fourth graduating class, the College as it is known today was still being built.

Dr. Owen Ellington

Dr. Owen Ellington

The main Crescent building was a work in progress, with only the medical school wing completed. Otherwise on campus, only the student housing, animal lab and research facility were complete.

Ellington returned to the College to share reflections on his experience at the annual alumni dinner late last year.

He provided many relatable snapshots of the early years of the campus.

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February 29, 2016 at 1:07 pm Leave a comment

Penn State Hershey Ghana team update, Feb. 26

Reena Thomas, Elizabeth Wallace, Corinne Landis, and Kate Belser.

Reena Thomas, Elizabeth Wallace, Corinne Landis and Kate Belser.

Editor’s note:  Penn State Hershey clinical participants (senior medical students, residents, nurse practitioner students and faculty) are currently in rural Ghana to support and provide training for Ghanaian clinicians at the Eastern Regional Hospital. The trip is made possible partially thanks to a partnership with Mountcrest University College, which has helped with medical logistics and travel in the country. The team is sending periodic updates while there.

It’s our last day here at Regional Hospital Koforidua and we are certainly sad to say goodbye. Reflecting back on the past four weeks, we have been a part of a wonderful start to a beautiful collaboration between Mountcrest University College, Penn State College of Medicine and Regional Hospital Koforidua. It has been a very impressive month filled with interesting cases including marasmus, malaria and meningitis. Even more impressive, however, is the wonderful staff with whom we have been able to work alongside and form lasting relationships with. An inspiring group of dedicated, hard working, and resourceful medical providers.

We enjoyed our time with the patients and staff of the Regional Hospital Koforidua and are incredibly grateful for this opportunity. With much appreciation we say, ‘Me da ase pa!’ – thank you so very much for welcoming us and letting us join your team and learn from your practice. We could not have asked for a better experience.

 

Written by Reena Thomas, Elizabeth Wallace, Corinne Landis, and Kate Belser. 

February 26, 2016 at 4:08 pm Leave a comment

New technology center builds on promises of College groundbreaking 50 years ago

Penn State Hershey groundbreaking

Eric Walker, president of The Pennsylvania State University; Sam Hinkle, Hershey Trust Company; Captain R.W. Roland, Penn State Board of Trustees president; and Arthur Whiteman, Hershey Trust Company, break snow-covered ground to signal the start of the construction of the Penn State Hershey campus on Feb. 26, 1966.

We’re all walking around with at least six billion pieces of information in our personal genome that, as the field of personalized medicine grows, can provide valuable clues to future health. When paired with clinical data from the electronic medical record (EMR), physicians will be able to provide individualized, precision medical care. The potential implications for improved health and efficiency of health care delivery are huge. So too are the technology needs to support that future.

In the not too distant future, every patient seen by providers at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Center will be offered genome analysis, something the organization’s founders could have never conceived of 50 years ago when the first shovel was plunged into the farm fields on Feb. 26, 1966, of what would become Penn State Hershey Medical Center and Penn State College of Medicine. The groundbreaking was a short three years after a $50 million gift offer from the M.S. Hershey Foundation to Penn State to establish a medical school and teaching hospital in Hershey.

“This is the most exciting time to be in medicine in terms of research capabilities and outcome for patients,” said Dr. James Broach, director of Penn State Hershey Institute for Personalized Medicine. “The first genome sequence was generated in 2003 and that took 10 years and $3 billion. Now, in one day for about $1,000, we can do the same thing.”

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February 26, 2016 at 10:24 am Leave a comment

Penn State Hershey Ghana team update, Feb. 25

Eileen Hennrikus

Dr. Eileen Hennrikus presents at a symposium in Ghana, bringing together representatives of Mountcrest University College, Penn State College of Medicine and Regional Hospital Koforidua.

Editor’s note:  Penn State Hershey clinical participants (senior medical students, residents, nurse practitioner students and faculty) are currently in rural Ghana to support and provide training for Ghanaian clinicians at the Eastern Regional Hospital. The trip is made possible partially thanks to a partnership with Mountcrest University College, which has helped with medical logistics and travel in the country. The team is sending periodic updates while there.

It has been an exciting two days here at Regional Hospital Koforidua as the inaugural symposium, a collaboration between Mountcrest University, Penn State College of Medicine and Regional Hospital Koforidua, was held. Presenters included representatives from all institutions and covered topics ranging from neonatal resuscitation, diabetes management and improving surgical outcomes for thyphoid fever to acid base abnormalities, management of club foot, and the sociocultural impact of diseases including HIV.

Our very own Kate Thompson, Med/Peds PGY4, Haley Spagnole, Peds PGY3, Dr. Eileen Hennrikus, Internal Medicine, and Dr. William Hennrikus, Peds Orthopedics, presented topics throughout the conference.

Overall the conference was a tremendous success and as medical students, soon to be interns, it was very educational and a wonderful demonstration of interdisciplinary and cultural collaboration.

Written by Reena Thomas, Elizabeth Wallace, Corinne Landis, and Kate Belser. 

February 25, 2016 at 1:32 pm Leave a comment

Pediatric survivorship program provides support after treatment

Penn State Hershey program is supported by Four Diamonds.

DSC_6914FINAL

An event on Feb. 21 brought the excitement of Penn State IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon (THON) to Penn State Hershey Children’s Hospital. The THON Reveal Party in the Tree House Café coincided with the final moments of the 46-hour dance marathon. Those moments included the final “reveal” that the latest effort had raised $9.8 million for Four Diamonds, whose mission is to conquer childhood cancer. One of the programs supported by Four Diamonds is the pediatric cancer survivorship clinic.

Each year, as the rate of children cured from pediatric cancers increases, so does the need for ongoing care of the young survivors.

Six years ago, Penn State Hershey Children’s Hospital started a survivorship clinic to educate children and young adults who have completed their cancer treatments about the therapy they received and possible late-arriving side effects of it.

“Most of the time, therapy-related complications happen several years after therapy is finished, when they are young adults,” said Dr. Smita Dandekar, head of the program. That’s why children are invited to the program at least five years after their original diagnosis, and at least two years after they have completed their treatments.

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February 22, 2016 at 10:58 am Leave a comment

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