Posts filed under ‘Photos’

St. Joseph and Penn State Health union viewed as beneficial to community

The unveiling of the Nittany Lion statue at Penn State Health St. Joseph.

The unveiling of the Nittany Lion statue at Penn State Health St. Joseph.

When Dave Ruppert found himself in the emergency department of St Joseph Medical Center in Reading in 2012 with symptoms that eventually led to a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, he also found a new healthcare home. Impressed by the professionalism, personal attention and level of service he found at St. Joseph during that tough time, Ruppert later had all his medical services transferred to St. Joseph.

“It wasn’t just any one person, but everyone from the providers to the billing department,” he said. “They are willing to help you out, they understand you and you don’t get shuffled around. They take care of you as an individual, not as a number.”

When it was time for surgery, Ruppert benefitted from St. Joseph’s oncology partnership with Penn State Hershey that meant he was able to get the highest level of care through recommendations from local doctors.

That’s why Ruppert was pleased to learn that St. Joseph Regional Health Network has become part of Penn State Health, the university’s newly-formed health system that will also include Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.

<<View photos from the recent welcoming ceremony for St. Joseph.>>

“I always recommend St. Joseph to people, and I have high expectations for this,” he said. “I think it’s a really good move.”

Ruppert isn’t the only one who believes St. Joseph is a special place and that becoming part of the Penn State family will only improve it.

Marc Rovito, medical director of St. Joseph Cancer Center, has been a Penn State employee at St. Joseph for four years through a provider-service agreement with Penn State Hershey.
(more…)

July 9, 2015 at 11:17 am 1 comment

Penn State Hershey’s first wilderness medicine training prepares emergency doctors

Emergency medicine leaders, faculty, residents, and students participated in wilderness training.

Emergency Medicine leaders, faculty, residents, and students participated in wilderness training.

Identifying poisonous snakes and knotting climbing ropes to form a makeshift litter are not typically taught in medical school.

But emergency medicine doctors need to be creative, flexible and have a broad knowledge base.

That’s why Dr. Jeff Lubin, associate professor of emergency medicine and Life Lion division chief, took emergency medicine residents and medical students out of the emergency department and into the wild.

“It is very applicable,” Lubin said of the first wilderness medicine training offered by Penn State Hershey. “One of the things they need to understand is what happens outside the hospital, because they are going to be receiving those patients.”

Lubin worked with Life Lion flight paramedic and wilderness medicine enthusiast Saul Elertas to design the training at the Boy Scouts of America’s Camp Bashore near Jonestown in Dauphin County.

Dressed in fleece, sweatshirts and hiking boots against an unseasonably cool May morning, Elertas reminded the residents of basic rules about making assumptions, planning ahead and taking care of themselves outdoors.

None were complaining about the assignment.

“This was mandatory, but I would have volunteered anyway,” said Keane McCullum, a first-year medical student who is working as Lubin’s research assistant for the summer.

<< Click here to view photos from the day’s activities. >>

(more…)

June 23, 2015 at 7:31 am Leave a comment

Bringing holiday cheer: Inspired staff decorate doors in HVI units for the holidays

IMG_0123Tweety Bird, Olaf, Popeye and The Grinch are keeping an eye on patients and staff in the critical and progressive care Heart and Vascular inpatient units at Penn State Hershey this month. Each character hangs out on its own sliding glass door, which — at this time of year — provides both privacy and a canvas for spreading holiday cheer.

This December is the fourth year that critical care unit staff has painted holiday scenes and symbols on the entrances to each of its 30 patient rooms, offering a boost to morale for both employees and patients alike. The progressive care unit next door is in on the fun as well. Glass doors are decked out with snowmen, Santa Claus, elves — even a minion from the popular movie “Despicable Me.”

Across the hall, rooms with wooden doors have been wrapped like gifts. One door displays snowflakes and photographs of the nursing staff, with mustaches drawn on their pictures and the title “Staching through the Snow.” Another has become a penguin, using the standard-issue yellow socks as mittens.

“It’s ingenious how they incorporate things around here,” says Nikki Clutton, a patient care secretary who works night shift in the Heart and Vascular Critical Care Unit (HVCCU). Clutton is responsible for a good part of the art in her unit, together with registered nurse Ron Long.

“I have always been into art and I love to draw, so it was really cool that they let us have this fun and freedom,” Clutton says.

(more…)

December 15, 2014 at 10:00 am Leave a comment

Inspired by his father, Dr. Joseph Gascho’s photography series highlights support personnel

Keyanna Buchanan

Keyanna Buchanan

While portraits of deans, department chairs and board members are often hung around campus, a series of photographs by Dr. Joseph Gascho, Penn State Hershey Heart and Vascular Institute, highlights the importance of those not in the spotlight at Penn State Hershey.

Gascho, a cardiologist, enjoys photography and has had his work featured both on and off campus. His current project is located in the hallway alongside the cafeteria, off the Rotunda elevators. More of his work is also on display at Lebanon Art Center.

“I enjoy capturing moments, recording memories, making something hopefully artistic and pleasing to the eye, seeing something in a new way,” Gascho said. “A lot of my medical photographs are designed to show that patients are people, more than just heart attacks or gall bladders. I want to show the humanity of people.”

(more…)

October 27, 2014 at 12:14 pm Leave a comment

Celebrating Survivorship at Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute

The messages on the wall inside Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute show why surviving cancer is something to celebrate.

“Today I’m celebrating 12 years breast cancer free and five years leukemia free.”

“Two years and counting.”

“Just starting my fight, I will win.”

On Wednesday, June 4, the staff and patients of the Cancer Institute joined in the celebration of the 27th Annual National Cancer Survivors Day, honoring more than 14,000,000 cancer survivors in the United States.

cancersurvivorsday

Click here to view other images

 

Sandy Spoljaric, a retired infusion nurse, was one of the volunteers on hand to greet patients. She worked for Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center for more than 23 years and for her the event was a homecoming. She was happy to see some of the patients she’s helped over the years. (more…)

June 11, 2014 at 12:48 pm Leave a comment

Disaster simulation tests trauma training of emergency medicine residents

Emergency medicine is all about response. When it comes to disasters like bombings and shootings, time and resources are limited, but medical personnel need to work with what they have to control the situation and ensure everyone’s safety.

Resident physicians from the Department of Emergency Medicine at Penn State Hershey Medical Center recently participated in a drill that simulated one such disaster. The scenario involved a bombing at a marathon where several victims, who were played by actors, required immediate medical attention. The scene was tense as the residents hurried to the victims and began prioritizing them based on the severity of their injuries. Radios blared and lights flared to add to the commotion.

 

Disaster training - resident treats an actor playing a wounded soldier.

Click here to view other images from the training session

 

(more…)

May 28, 2014 at 9:09 am Leave a comment

Zeke pays a visit to the Life Lion team

On April 4, Zeke, the Harrisburg canine officer who was recently shot in the line of duty, and his handler, Cpl. Ty Meik, were reunited with the Penn State Hershey Life Lion Critical Care Transport team that treated Zeke in the moments after the shooting and flew him to an animal trauma center. It was at that center that Zeke received life-saving care.

Crew members say caring for Zeke was a first, but it was made easier by his demeanor. “He was never, ever nasty toward anybody,” said Steve Weihbrecht, flight paramedic. “Obviously, he was extremely frightened. Ty, his handler, did a great job of keeping him under control.”

 

“It looks like he’s doing well,” said Daniel Mease, a flight nurse who administered intravenous fluids to Zeke after the March 15 shooting. “It was fun watching him on the news, getting better each day.”

April 5, 2013 at 3:20 pm 1 comment

Older Posts


Enter your email address to subscribe to Penn State Medicine and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 343 other followers

Share This Page

Bookmark and Share

Are you a fan yet?

Categories

Recent Tweets

Recent Posts


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 343 other followers